Newsletter | Nordic | 2 Dec 2016

New issue of Media Trends in the Nordic countries

News consumption online is increasing. At the same time, print media revenues are falling, and media politicians are trying to come up with solutions. Read more in the new issue of Nordicom’s Nordic newsletter.

Media Trends in the Nordic Countries 3-2016 reports on a number of media surveys, research results, media policy issues, etc., in the Nordic arena. Below are some examples of content in the December edition.

Competition from global players on the advertising market is growing. In this issue, we present a Nordic study in progress, launched by Nordicom and commissioned by the Nordic Council of Ministers. The research will be completed in Spring 2017.

Nordicom’s overview of the largest media companies on the Nordic market shows e.g. that companies with their core operations in newspapers are losing revenue, whereas TV distributors are growing and making profit. National surveys show a continuing decline on the media market in Finland, and a continuing fall in advertising revenue for newspapers in Norway and Sweden.

Two media investigations have delivered their final reports. The Danish public service committee has presented five future scenarios for the public service media, and the Swedish media investigation suggests platform-neutral media support to replace the present support for printed newspapers.

One media policy tool is value added tax, VAT. On December 1st, the European Commission opened up for equal VAT for printed and digital newspapers and books, an issue that has long been under debate. Nordicom has mapped the VAT rates for the media sectors in the Nordic countries.

The Nordic countries are at the top of most international comparisons of Internet and IT technology. In a report by the Broadband Commission, Iceland stands out as having the highest share worldwide of individuals using the Internet, with Norway and Denmark close behind. Finland has the world’s highest share of active mobile broadband subscriptions.

News consumption online is increasing. In Sweden, the Internet has become the most important source of information, and among the young in Norway, the smart phone is the most common platform for consuming news. A Danish report shows that the young seek out and use news across different platforms, while older people use traditional media.

Moreover, a Eurobarometer survey shows that Finns and Swedes prefer going directly to the news sources – via newspaper websites or apps – to a larger extent than the EU average.

While Internet access is approaching saturation in the developed world, half of the world’s population – almost four billion people – are still offline. And a report by Freedom House shows that freedom on the net is on the decline, with increasing numbers of people living in countries where people have been arrested for publishing, sharing, or simply “liking” Facebook content. At the same time, Iceland is rated as an international leader in promoting free speech.

 

Download: Media Trends in the Nordic Countries 3-2016 (PDF)
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BY: EVA HARRIE