Men in large majority in the news

NEWS | 10 January 2016

The 5th global news report, the Global Media Monitoring Project show that men are still in a large majority in the news.

The International Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP) is carried out every five years and examines how women and men depicted in the news for a day. This year, 114 countries have participated in GMMP, making it the most comprehensive study since the start in 1995.

Reports discussing national findings were compiled for some of the 114 participating countries.

Nordic country reports are available for Denmark, Finland and Sweden. Some Nordic results are presented in the global and the Swedish report.

Women and men as news subjects in the Nordic countries 2015
(graph from the Swedish report, page 39)


Note: Data refer to news subjects, i.e. people who speak out or people who are subjects of the news. Included media are newspapers, radio and television in the Nordic region in 2015. Number of people appearing in each country’s news media: Denmark 357, Finland 391, Iceland 103, Norway 270, Sweden 620. Source: www.whomakesthenews.org

 

Read more about national findings from

Denmark (in English)
Global Media Monitoring Project 2015
National report
Authors: Hanne Jørndrup and Martine Bentsen​

Finland (in English)
Global Media Monitoring Project 2015
National report
Author: Jonita Siivonen

Norway (in Norwegian)
Kilden - kjønnsforskning.no about the Norwegian survey

Sweden (in Swedish)
RÄKNA MED KVINNOR
Global Media Monitoring Project 2015
National report
Authors: Maria Edström and Josefine Jacobsson

Read more about the global study and download other country reports

 

About the Global Media Monitoring Project: GMMP is a research and advocacy initiative that pursues gender equality in and through the news media. It is hosted by Who Makes the News (WMTN), a knowledge, information and resource portal on gender and the media, run by WACC, a non-governmental organisation that builds on communication rights in order to promote social justice. 

 

BY: KARIN POULSEN

 

 

NEWS