NEWS | 5 Apr 2017

Great uncertainty about fake news in Norway

According to a recent study conducted by the Norwegian Media Authority, more than half of the members of the Norwegian population report reading, weekly or more often, news that they perceive to be untrue. Almost a quarter also say that they have shared news that they later realized was fake. 

On behalf of the Ministry of Culture, the Norwegian Media Authority carried out a study focusing on the understanding of fake news among the population. A total of 1000 people aged between 18 and 80 participated and were asked questions about the sharing and spreading of fake news and who they think is responsible for preventing the dispersion and increasing the media literacy and source criticism among the population. 

Some key findings 

  • The study shows that 55 per cent of the members of the population report reading, weekly or more often, news that they perceive not to be true and 45 per cent see news, weekly or more often, that they think is made up or deliberately fake. 
  • A total of 23 per cent of Norwegian people have shared news at least once that they later realized was fake, and 15 per cent have at least once shared news that they knew or suspected to be fake
  • A total of 68 per cent of the population answered that traditional media have a very big responsibility for preventing the spreading of fake news, 49 per cent answered social media and as many answered the government, politicians and other elected people. Only 27 per cent answered that the population itself has a substantial responsibility for preventing the spreading of fake news. 
  • The respondents’ opinions about who is responsible for increasing the media literacy and source criticism among the population are distributed: 50 per cent referred to traditional media, 47 per cent to schools/education and 46 per cent to public authorities. Further, 38 per cent stated that social media have a very large responsibility and 26 per cent that the responsibility rests with the population. 

 

Read more about the study and the results here (in Norwegian) 

The study is built on a similar study made official by TU in Sweden, in February 2017. In turn, that study was based on an American study carried out by the Pew Research Center, officially published in December 2016. 

 

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MIA JONSSON LINDELL