NYHET | 22 jan 2015

EAO Yearbook: Market stagnation despite growth in VoD and pay TV

The European audiovisual market experienced a year of stagnation in 2013. And worldwide the European audiovisual media groups have lost more than five per cent of their global market share over the last five years, according to the EAO Yearbook 2014.

The European Audiovisual Observatory has published the 20th edition of its yearbook on television, cinema, video and on-demand audiovisual services. The publication covers 40 European states and offers country by country data as well as the pan-European picture and some worldwide comparisons.

Growth in pay TV and VoD
The European market has seen a rapid rise in on-demand services in 2013. But still the audiovisual sector in Europe experienced a stagnation, with a fall in market generated revenues from 2012 to 2013. The sector most affected is physical video (-11.3%), but for example cinema receipts and video games also experienced a downturn. The growth in the activities of pay TV platforms (+2.7%) and in the production of online video-on-demand services (+46.1%) could not compensate for the decline in the other activities.

Loss for European audiovisual groups
The stagnation of the European market and the fact that the two growth areas are mainly controlled by American groups means that the European groups lost 2 per cent of their global market share between 2012 and 2013 and a total of 5.3 per cent between 2009 and 2013.

Read EAO press release 21/01/2015

 

About: The European Audiovisual Observatory is a European public service body comprised of 40 member states and the European Union, represented by the European Commission. Its mission is to gather and distribute information on the audiovisual industry in Europe. Among its major activities are the publication of a yearbook, newsletters and reports plus online databases, e.g. the free accessible MAVISE database on TV and on-demand audiovisual services and companies in Europe and IRIS Merlin database on legal information relevant to the audiovisual sector in Europe.

 

BY: EVA HARRIE

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